Trieste, 1943-1954 (Book, 1962) [WorldCat.org]
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Trieste, 1943-1954

Author: Dino Mernone; Edgar R Rosen
Publisher: 1962.
Dissertation: M.A. Dept. of History. University of Kansas City 1962
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Summary:
Trieste is a province, city and port on the northeastern Adriatic (population 225,000 in 1943) and was formerly the chief city of the Italian provinceof Venezia Giulia and Zara (area 3,456 sqare miles, population 977,257 in 1936). The province of Venezia Giulia and Zara had formed part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire before World War I, while Trieste had been under Hapsburg domination from 1382. It was then (1910)  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Academic theses
History
Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript
Document Type: Book, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Dino Mernone; Edgar R Rosen
OCLC Number: 32749821
Notes: Advisor: Edgar R. Rosen.
Typescript.
Description: iv, 132 leaves ; 28 cm
Contents: Preface --
Acknowledgements --
Trieste, 1943-1945. Conclusion of the Armistice ; Allied control commission of Italy ; The Badoglio Period ; The German occupation --
Trieste under Tito --
Trieste, 1945-1947. Council of Foreign Ministers in London ; Reactions to findings of London conference ; Appointment of the commission ; Meeting of council of foreign ministers ; Creation of the Free Territory of Trieste --
The United Nations. The Security Council ; The Allied Military Government (AMG) ; Military government policy ; Organization of government --
Commerce and industry of Trieste. Importance as a port ; The road to recovery ; Revival of the port --
The Tripartite Agreement, March 20, 1948 --
Political parties of Zone A --
Trieste and its points of interest --
Italo-Yugoslav struggle over Venezia Giulia --
History of Trieste --
Appendices I-V --
Bibliography.
Responsibility: by Dino Mernone.

Abstract:

Trieste is a province, city and port on the northeastern Adriatic (population 225,000 in 1943) and was formerly the chief city of the Italian provinceof Venezia Giulia and Zara (area 3,456 sqare miles, population 977,257 in 1936). The province of Venezia Giulia and Zara had formed part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire before World War I, while Trieste had been under Hapsburg domination from 1382. It was then (1910) called the Austrian Kustenland and had an area of 3,084 sqare miles with a population of 755, 183. Immediately after World War I, the Austro-Hungarian Empire was broken up. A new nation, named the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, was formed on December 1, 1918. By August, 1929 the country was known as the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. From its inception through October, 1954, Yugoslavia contested the rights of Italy to Venezia Giulia and Trieste. In 1920 all of Venezia Giulia, except the city of Fiume, was ceded to Italy. Four years later, Fiume also passed under Italian sovereignty. Yugoslavia, however, never completely accepted these changes, basing her claims on the premise that portions of Venezia Giulia were inhabited by a predominance of Slovene-speaking people. In September, 1943 the Germans took control of Venezia Giulia after Italy had signed an armistice with the Allies. Trieste and adjacent areas thus remained in German hands until their armies withdrew in April, 1945. Marshal Tito's Yugoslav IX Corps then immediately occupied Trieste and the largest portion of the surrounding towns and villages. However, the 2nd New Zealand Division also entered the city to eliminate remaining pockets of German resistance against the Yugoslavs and the Partisans. The American forces occupied Venezia Giulia from Gorizia to the north. This confusion was cleared up after numerous conferences between British Lieutenant General (later Sir) WIlliam D. Morgan and Yugoslav General Ivo Jovanovic. On June 9, 1945, under the terms of an agreement, Venezia Giulia was divided into Zones A and B, with the so-called "Morgan Line" marking the division. Zone A was administered by the British and the Americans, while Zone B was placed under Yugoslav administration. Under the terms of the Italian Peace Treaty, effective September 15, 1947, additional agreements ceded a sizeable portion of the disputed area, predominantly Slovene in Character, to Yugoslavia. Another portion, predominantly Italian, was ceded to Italy. The remaining portion, including the city of Trieste, was constituted as a Free Territory. This territory was divided into two zones: a British-United States Zone in the north, and a Yugoslav Zone in the south. An Allied Military Government, composed of British and American military and civilian personnel, was appointed to remain in the Free Territory pending the appointment of a governor by the United Nations. Supporting the Allied Military Government were troops of Great Britain and the United States. On September 16, 1946, Senator Tom COnnally, speaking before the Political and Territorial Commission for Italy on the subject of the Free Territory of Trieste and the statute for its government, said, "The United States delegation has submitted a proposed draft of the statute for the government of the Fre Territory of the Trieste which we commend to the study and consideration of the Commission. The United Statesattaches great importance to the relationship of the Free Territory of Trieste with the Security Council of the United Nations. It is proposed that the constitution of the Free Territory shall be submitted to the Security Council for its approval. This constitution must establish and define the structure of the government and must contain guarantees to the citizens. We also regard it as vital that adequate guarantees be provided for the absolute independence and integrity of the Free Territory--not alone from Italy and Yugoslavia but from other powers. Its international character must be maintained and protected. It must be strong enough to secure the rights and freedoms of its inhabitants. We hold that the Governor of the Free Territory, who is to be appointed by the Security Council, should be regarded as the agent of the Council and should be entrusted with the power and means to meet [garbled]. The Governor must possess sufficient power to preserve public order and to insure the observance of the statute for the control of the Free Territory." Events were to prove that the Security Council was never successful in the appointment of a governor for the Free Territory of Trieste because of its inability to agree upon a single candidate.

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