Letters of Samuel Rutherford: a selection (Book, 1973) [WorldCat.org]
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Letters of Samuel Rutherford: a selection

Author: Samuel Rutherford
Publisher: London : Banner of Truth Trust, 1973. ©1973
Series: Puritan paperbacks.
Edition/Format:   Print book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Like John Bunyan in Bedford gaol, Samuel Rutherford did his best work while suffering imprisonment for the gospel. His opponents had meant to silence him but instead they perpetuated his ministry through the centuries for it was out of this period that most of his famous Letters came. Addressed to high and low they were so prized by the recipients that the first collection by Robert McWard appeared in 1664 just  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Rutherford, Samuel, 1600?-1661.
Letters of Samuel Rutherford.
London, Banner of Truth Trust, 1973
(OCoLC)609258915
Named Person: Samuel Rutherford; Samuel Rutherford
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Samuel Rutherford
ISBN: 0851511635 9780851511634
OCLC Number: 754885
Notes: "First edition of Letters published 1664" -- Title page verso.
Description: 206 pages : 18 cm.
Contents: To A Christian Gentlewoman: [On the death of a daughter] --
To Marion M'naught: Submission, perseverance and zeal recommended --
To Lady Kenmure: God's inexplicable dealings with his people well-ordered --
To Marion M'naugh: [In prospect of the Lord's Supper] --
To Marion M'naught: The threatened introduction of the Service-Book --
To John Kennedy: Deliverance from shipwreck --
To Lady Kenmure: A union for prayer recommended --
To Lady Kenmure: [On the death of Lord Kenmure) --
To Marion M'naught: The prospect of exile in Aberdeen --
To Lady Kenmure: [On the eve of banishment to Aberdeen) --
To Lady Culross: [On the occasion of banishment to Aberdeen) --
To Robert Cunningham: Consolation to a brother in tribulation --
To Alexander Gordon: Rutherford's feeling upon leaving Anworth --
To Lady Kenmure: Rutherford's enjoyment of Christ in Aberdeen --
To Hugh M'kail: Christ to be trusted amid trial --
To Marion M'naught: Comfort under tribulations --
To John Gordon, Elder: Will Christ at all hazards --
To Robert Blair: God's arrangements sometimes mysterious --
To Robert Gordon: Visits of Christ --
To Lady Kenmure: None worthy but Christ --
To David Dickson: God's dealings --
To Alexander Henderson: Sadness because Christ's Headship not set forth --
To John Gordon, Younger: Reasons for being earnest about the soul --
To Marion M'naught: Adherence to duty amidst opposition --
To William Livingstone: Counsel to a youth --
To Thb Laird Of Carleton: Increasing sense of Christ's love --
To John Fleming: Directions for Christian conduct --
To Lady Boyd: Lessons learned in the school of adversity --
To John Stuart: Commercial misfortunes --
To David Dickson: Christ's infinite fulness --
To John Clark: Marks of difference between Christians and --
To Earlston, Younger: Dangers of youth --
To William Dalgleish: Fragrance of the ministry --
To John Stuart: Hope for Scotland --
To Earlstoh, Younger: Sufferings --
To William Gordon: Testimony to Christ's worth --
To John Henderson: Practical hints --
To Alexander Colvill: Regrets for being silenced in ministry --
To James Hamilton: Suffering for Christ's Headship --
To Parishioners of Anwoth: Protestation of care for their souls and for the glory of God --
To Lady Kilconquhar: The interests of the soul most urgent --
To Lord Craighall: Standing for Christ --
To Hugh M'kail: The Law --
To Fulk Ellis: Friends in Ireland --
To Jambs Lindsay: Desertions and their use --
To Jambs Hamilton: Christ's glory not affected by his people's weakness --
To Lady Gait Girth: Christ all example in Cross-bearing --
To Marion M'naught: Prospects of his ministry --
To James Bautie: Spiritual difficulties resolved --
To Thomas Corbet: Godly counsels --
To William Glendinning: Sweetness of trial --
To Marion M'naught: A Spring-tide of Christ's love --
To John Gordon: Heaven hard to be won --
To Parishioners Of Kilmalcolm: Spiritual sloth --
To Alexander Leighton: Christs' prisoner in bonds at London --
To James Wilson: Advices to a doubting soul --
To David Dickson: [On the death of a son] --
To Lady Boyd: Proceedings of tile Westminster Assembly --
To Lady Kenmure: Westminster Assembly Religious sects --
To J.G.: Depression in a cloudy day --
To William Guthrie: Depression under dark trials --
TO LADY RALSTON: Duty of preferring to live rather than die --
TO LADY KENMURE: Trials --
To James Durham: [On his deathbed] --
To James Guthrie, Robert Traill and other brethren imprisoned in Edinburgh Castle: On suffering for Christ --
To Mistress Craig: [On the death of her son] --
To James Guthrie: Steadfastness under persecution --
To Robert Campbell: Steadfastness in protest against prelacy and popery --
To Brethern In Aberdeen": Sinful conformity and schismatic designs reproved --
Brief notes on Rutherford's correspondents --
An outline of Rutherford's life.
Series Title: Puritan paperbacks.
Responsibility: Samuel Rutherford.

Abstract:

Like John Bunyan in Bedford gaol, Samuel Rutherford did his best work while suffering imprisonment for the gospel. His opponents had meant to silence him but instead they perpetuated his ministry through the centuries for it was out of this period that most of his famous Letters came. Addressed to high and low they were so prized by the recipients that the first collection by Robert McWard appeared in 1664 just three years after Rutherford's death. the successive editions contained more letters until they grew to the 365 in Andrew Bonar's classic edition. From this, 'the most remarkable series of devotional letters that the literature of the Reformed churches can show', the great leaders in the Church as well as the humblest Christians have drawn strength. It is said of Robert Murray M'Cheyne that 'the Letters of Samuel Rutherford were often in his hand.' This abridged edition contains sixty-nine of these letters. --

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