Cinematic storytelling : the 100 most powerful film conventions every filmmaker must know (Book, 2005) [WorldCat.org]
skip to content
Cinematic storytelling : the 100 most powerful film conventions every filmmaker must know Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Cinematic storytelling : the 100 most powerful film conventions every filmmaker must know

Author: Jennifer Van Sijll
Publisher: Studio City, CA : Michael Wiese Productions, ©2005.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Dialog is one of the best known - and obvious - elements in a film. But the language of cinema is more subtle and sophisticated than dialog alone. From Metropolis to Kill Bill, this remarkable reference guide reveals 100 of the most potent storytelling tools of the film medium. It demonstrates how master screenwriters and directors depend on cinematic devices to pump up action, create characters, and energize a  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Jennifer Van Sijll
ISBN: 193290705X 9781932907056
OCLC Number: 56798937
Description: xii, 257 pages : illustrations ; 19 x 28 cm
Contents: Introduction: Cinematic storytelling: The screenwriter; The problem; What does this mean for the screenwriter?; Script excerpts ; Cinematic storytelling: The director; The problem; What does this mean for the director? --
1. Space: 2-D & 3D screen direction. X-axis (horizontal): Strangers on a train ; Y-axis (vertical): Strangers on a train ; XY (diagonals): Metropolis, The piano ; Z-axis (Depth of field): Citizen Kane ; Z-axis (planes of action): Dolores Claiborne ; Z-axis (rack focus): The graduate --
2. Frame: composition. Directing the eye: Citizen Kane ; Imbalance: Disco pigs ; Balance: Disco pigs ; Orientation: Apocalypse now, Barton Fink ; Size: Metropolis --
3. Shape within the frame. Circular: The conversation ; Linear: Fargo ; Triangular: Witness ; Rectangular: The searchers ; Organic versus geometric: Witness --
4. Editing: Pudovkin's five editing techniques. Introduction: a little theory ; Five editing principles ; "On editing" ; Editing: additional techniques ; Montage: Citizen Kane, Adaptation ; Assembly: Psycho ; Mise-en-sc̈ne: Psycho ; Intercutting: Cabaret ; Split screen: Kill Bill Vol. 1 ; Dissolves: Citizen Kane, Barton Fink ; Smash cut: American beauty --
5. Time. Expanding time through pacing: Barton Fink ; Contrast of time and intercutting: Pulp fiction ; Expanding time, overlapping action: Pulp fiction ; Slo-motion: Raging bull ; Fast-motion (time compression) : Amélie ; Flashback: Sunset Boulevard ; Flash forward: The people vs. Larry Flynt ; Freeze frame: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Thelma and Louise, The 400 blows ; Visual foreshadowing: The Piano --
6. Sound effects. Realistic sound (diegetic) (character): Klute ; Realistic sound (diegetic) (emotional response): ET ; Expressive sound (diegetic) (outer world): Barton Fink ; Surreal sound (meta-diegetic) (inner world): Barton Fink --
7. Music. Lyrics as narrator: Apocalypse now ; Symbolic use of music: Shawshank redemption ; Music as a moveable prop: Out of Africa --
8. Scene transitions (audio and visual). Marching audio segue: Sorry, wrong number, Fatal attraction ; Audio bridge (dialogue): Citizen Kane ; Audio bridge (sound effects): Barton Fink ; Visual match-cut (graphic similarity): Single white female ; Visual match-cut (pattern and color): Citizen Kane ; Visual match-cut (action): 2001: a space odyssey ; Visual match-cut (idea): Requiem for a dream, Harold and Maude ; Extended match dissolve (time transition): Titanic ; Disrupted match-cut : Bound. 9. Camera lenses. Wide angle: Citizen Kane ; Wide angle (vistas and establishing shots): The piano ; Telephoto: The graduate ; Fisheye: Requiem for a dream ; Prop lenses within the scene (fisheye): Citizen Kane ; Objects: Dances with wolves --
10. Camera position. Close-up (CU): The piano ; Extreme close-up (ECU): Kill Bill Vol. 1 ; Two shot: The piano ; Over-the-shoulder (OTS): Chinatown, The piano ; Point-of-view (POV) : Halloween, Jaws ; High angle: Citizen Kane ; Low angle: ET ; Hi-lo combined: Psycho --
11. Camera motion. Static shot: Klute ; Pan: Dances with Wolves ; Tilt up (character): The Professional ; Tilt down: Fargo ; Rotation: Bound, Apocalypse now ; Tracking shot: Fatal attraction ; Circular: Reservoir dogs ; Push in, push out: Fargo ; Crane: Touch of evil ; Handheld: Touch of evil, Pulp fiction ; Steadicam: Goodfellas ; Aerial: The piano --
12. Lighting. Rembrandt lighting (light versus dark): Apocalypse now ; TV lighting: Natural born killers ; Candlelight: American beauty ; Motivated lighting: Fatal attraction ; Unmotivated lighting: The professional ; Motion: ET --
13. Color. Coding character:Three Women --
14. Props. Props (externalizing character): Barton Fink, Raging bull ; Re-purposing props: Bound ; Contrast: Harold and Maude --
15. Wardrobe. Wardrobe: Ed Wood ; Re-purposing wardrobe: Out of Africa ; Contrast of wardrobe: Bound --
16. Locations. Defining character: Hedwig and the angry inch ; Location as unifying element: The sweet hereafter ; Location as theme: Blue velvet ; Moving locations: Deadman --
17. Natural environment. Climate: Sixth sense ; Seasons and the passage of time: Amélie ; Physical phenomena: Dolores Claiborne.
Responsibility: Jennifer Van Sijll.
More information:

Abstract:

"Dialog is one of the best known - and obvious - elements in a film. But the language of cinema is more subtle and sophisticated than dialog alone. From Metropolis to Kill Bill, this remarkable reference guide reveals 100 of the most potent storytelling tools of the film medium. It demonstrates how master screenwriters and directors depend on cinematic devices to pump up action, create characters, and energize a motion picture's plot. Cinematic Storytelling compresses 100 years of film history, outlining the important connection between film technique and storytelling. It shows how the purposeful use of film techniques like lighting, editing, and sound can evoke audience emotions like fear, hatred, or anger without a word of dialog. It demonstrates how character values and themes are expressed cumulatively over time and nonverbally. In this, the reader is given both the critical tools to better understand modern moviemaking and the creative tools to more fully exploit the dramatic potential of the medium."--Jacket.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

All user tags (1)

View most popular tags as: tag list | tag cloud

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(5)

User lists with this item (19)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.