Children of Incarcerated Parents: A Bill of Rights (Article, 2010) [WorldCat.org]
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Children of Incarcerated Parents: A Bill of Rights

Author: San Francisco Children of Incarcerated Parents Partnership
Edition/Format: Chapter Chapter : English
Summary:
More than two million American children have a parent behind bars today. Seven million, or one in ten of the nation's children, have a parent under criminal justice supervision—in jail or prison, on probation, or on parole. Little is known about what becomes of children when their parents are incarcerated. There is no requirement that systems serving children—schools, child welfare, juvenile justice—address parental  Read more...
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Details

All Authors / Contributors: San Francisco Children of Incarcerated Parents Partnership
ISBN: 9780520252493; 9780520944565
Publication:Solinger, Rickie, author; Interrupted Life : Experiences of Incarcerated Women in the United States; University of California Press
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 5104886610
Awards:
Other Titles: Part One Defining the Problem
Chapter 5

Abstract:

More than two million American children have a parent behind bars today. Seven million, or one in ten of the nation's children, have a parent under criminal justice supervision—in jail or prison, on probation, or on parole. Little is known about what becomes of children when their parents are incarcerated. There is no requirement that systems serving children—schools, child welfare, juvenile justice—address parental incarceration. The children of prisoners are guaranteed nothing. They have committed no crime, but the penalty they are required to pay is steep. A criminal justice model that took as its constituency not just individuals charged with breaking the law, but also families and communities within which their lives are embedded—one that respected the rights and needs of children—might become one that inspired the confidence and respect of those families and communities, and so played a part in stemming, rather than perpetuating, the cycle of crime and incarceration. This chapter presents a Bill of Rights for children of incarcerated parents.

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