Behind the Trail of Broken Treaties; an Indian declaration of independence (Book, 1974) [WorldCat.org]
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Behind the Trail of Broken Treaties; an Indian declaration of independence

Author: Vine Deloria
Publisher: New York, Delacorte Press [1974]
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
An Indian spokesman calls for the federal government to reopen treaty-making procedures. Originally published in 1974, this book analyzes the history of Indian treaty relations with the United States. Vine Deloria presents population and land ownership information to support his argument that many Indian tribes have more impressive landholdings than some small members of the United Nations. A 2000 study published by  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Législation
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Vine Deloria
ISBN: 9780440014041 0440014042
OCLC Number: 805957
Description: xv, 263 pages 21 cm
Contents: Preamble to the present --
The emergence of Indian activism --
The occupation of the Bureau of Indian Affairs --
The confrontation at Wounded Knee --
The doctrine of discovery --
Dependent domestic nations --
The plenary power doctrine --
The size and status of nations --
The Indian Reorganization Act --
Litigating Indian claims --
The international arena --
Reinstituting the treaty process --
Afterword.
Responsibility: [by] Vine Deloria, Jr.

Abstract:

An Indian spokesman calls for the federal government to reopen treaty-making procedures. Originally published in 1974, this book analyzes the history of Indian treaty relations with the United States. Vine Deloria presents population and land ownership information to support his argument that many Indian tribes have more impressive landholdings than some small members of the United Nations. A 2000 study published by the Annual Survey of International and Comparative Law recommends that the United Nations offer membership to the Iroquois, Cherokee, Navajo, and other Indian tribes. Ironically, the study also recommends that smaller tribes band together to form a confederation to seek membership, a suggestion nearly identical to the one the United States made to the Delaware Indians in 1778, and that a presidential commission explore ways to move beyond the Doctrine of Discovery, under which European nations justified their confiscation of Indian lands.

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